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Infoline Blog

Infoline is BC Stats’ free information bulletin. Published since 1995, it has become an essential tool for executives, managers, analysts, libraries, businesses and media. It is our most widely distributed and timely review of statistical releases and events that shape or describe the economic and social fabric of British Columbia.

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  • Issue 16-183

    Tourism Room Revenues

    Room revenues continued to exhibit strong growth across British Columbia during the month of July. On a year-over-year basis, revenue growth was led by the Vancouver, Coast and Mountains tourism region (+14.5%), followed closely by The Islands (+11.0%) and Thompson/Okanagan (+10.9%). In addition, modest revenue growth was also recorded in the BC Rockies (+3.4%) and Northern (+2.0%) tourism regions.

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  • Issue 16-182

    Retail Sales

    Retail sales in the province bucked the national trend in July as sales climbed 0.9% (seasonally adjusted). Canadian sales stalled for the third straight month, inching down 0.1%. At the national level, slower sales at gas stations (-3.0%) and furniture and home furnishings stores (-1.4%) offset strength in other major industry groups, including clothing and clothing accessories (+1.6%). Retailers in most provinces posted losses. Along with B.C., Quebec (+0.2%), Nova Scotia (+0.6%) and Ontario (+0.8%) were the only provinces to record gains in July.

    Data Source: Statistics Canada

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  • Issue 16-181

    Consumer Price Index (CPI) Highlights

    British Columbia’s consumer price index (CPI) climbed 2.0% (unadjusted) in August, compared to the same month of the previous year. This marks a small decrease in the year-over-year rate of inflation since July, when it was 2.1%.

    According to Statistics Canada, the overall annual inflation rate of 2.0% increases to 2.5% when energy is excluded from the index, and remains unchanged at 2.0% when food is excluded.

    The overall cost of food rose by 2.2% since August of last year, with the cost of both groceries purchased from stores (+1.7%) and meals purchased from restaurants ...

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  • Issue 16-180

    Employment Insurance

    The number of British Columbians receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits rose 8.9% (seasonally adjusted) in July. More men (+11.0%) and women (+5.6%), received these benefits. Nationally, the number of EI beneficiaries was also higher (+4.4%) in July, with most provinces posting increases. Alberta (+23.6%) and Saskatchewan (+21.9%) saw the most substantive escalations in number of beneficiaries.

    Data Source: Statistics Canada

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  • Issue 16-179

    Wholesale Sales

    Wholesale sales in B.C. stalled in July, inching down 0.2%, (seasonally adjusted). The slight decrease was due mostly to declines in the miscellaneous and building material and supplies subsectors. Canadian sales were slightly stronger (+0.3%), with six provinces recording increases in wholesaling activities. Boosts in Ontario (+0.6%) and Quebec (+1.1%) had the biggest impact on the national increase.

    Data Source: Statistics Canada

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  • Issue 16-178

    Input Indicators of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2015 Edition

    The high technology sector is a vital part of the B.C. economy. This is reflected in the B.C. government’s first technology strategy, which includes a $100-million technology innovation fund to fuel the venture capital market in the province. High technology firms tend to be innovative and efficient. They create goods and services that confer benefits on other parts of the economy by improving productivity and profitability, while at the same time providing relatively high-wage employment.

    The picture of British Columbia that emerges from the most recent input indicators is varied. In many areas, British Columbia compares quite favourably with ...

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  • Issue 16-177

    Profile of the British Columbia Technology Sector: 2015 Edition

    The high technology sector is an integral part of the B.C. economy. The recognition of the importance of the sector to the province is reflected in its development of the #BCTECH Strategy, which outlines an approach to continue to nourish the sector and ensure its growth.

    High technology firms tend to be innovative and efficient, creating goods and services that confer benefits on other parts of the economy by improving productivity and profitability, while at the same time providing relatively high-wage employment. The tech sector in British Columbia is still relatively ...

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  • Issue 16-176

    Visitor Entries

    The number of travellers entering Canada via British Columbia increased (+0.7%, seasonally adjusted) in July. The number of American visitors climbed 0.8% and overseas entries were also slightly higher (+0.4%). Meanwhile, the number of Canadian tourists returning to B.C. from abroad continued to seesaw, jumping 2.6% in July, following a 4.5% drop-off recorded in June.

    Data source: Statistics Canada

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  • Issue 16-175

    2015 Apprenticeship Student Outcomes Survey

    The former traditional apprentices and those from progressive credential programs who were surveyed in 2015 were satisfied with their in-school training, and their pro¬grams were helpful in the development of key skills.

    Relative to the average labour force participation and employment rates for a similarly aged B.C. population, the employment outcomes for former traditional apprentices were exceptional. At the time of the survey, almost all of the former traditional apprentices were in the labour force. Their unemployment rate varied by region, but was 6.2 percent overall.

    Almost 9 out of 10 former traditional apprentices had ...

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  • Issue 16-174

    Manufacturing Sales

    Manufacturing sales in British Columbia climbed 2.2% (seasonally adjusted) to $11.9 billion in July, reaching their highest level since February of 2006. The overall boost was chiefly due to heightened shipments of non-durable goods (+2.8%). The increase in the non-durables sector was fuelled by higher sales in the paper industry (+12.9%), after maintenance shutdowns were reported by some establishments in June. Durables were also up (+1.7%), led by a climb in sales by manufacturers of wood (+4.6%). Sales by primary metal (+11.9%) manufacturers recorded the largest increase seen since November of 2014, and sales by producers of computer ...

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